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Help end the
suffering
behind
your food

Human suffering should never be an ingredient in the food we eat.

Millions of farmers and workers who produce our food are forced to work long hours in inhumane conditions. The burden of this injustice falls more heavily on women, who are discriminated against, paid less than men, and denied the same basic human and legal rights.

This has to stop. I pledge to stand with the people #BehindThePrice and to call for:

  • An end to inhumane and dangerous working conditions
  • Fair pay
  • Safe and decent work for women
  • Together, we can end the human suffering behind the food we all eat.

    I PLEDGE TO STAND WITH THE PEOPLE

    #BEHINDTHEPRICE

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    The facts behind the food industry

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    5 %

    For products like Ecuadorian bananas, Kenyan green beans, Indian tea, Vietnamese shrimp or Thai canned tuna, the share of the consumer price in Europe and the US that reaches small-scale farmers and workers is less than 5%.

    4,000

    It would take a woman processing shrimp at a typical plant in Indonesia or Thailand more than 4,000 years to earn what a chief executive at a top US supermarket earns in a year.

    800,000

    Cote d'Ivoire produces more than 40% of the cocoa for the world's $100bn chocolate market. But its 800,000 cocoa farmers are living in poverty.

    75 %

    In Italy, 75% of women workers on fruit and vegetable farms said they or a family member had cut back on the number of meals in the previous month due to very low wages, according to a survey carried out in June 2017.

    4 %

    The price of Brazilian orange juice in Europe and the US has shot up by almost 50% since the mid-90s, but the share that reaches small-scale farmers and workers has plummeted from 17% to 4%.

    3 %

    The price of Ecuadorian bananas in Europe and the US supermarkets has rocketed by 40% since 2001, but small-scale banana farmers are left with just 3% of that.

    Help us reveal what’s #BehindThePrice

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